Posts Tagged ‘Self-publishing’

Editor Wanted

March 28th, 2014 • by Karen A. Chase • 3 Comments

EditorSearching

Last week a freelance editor who I have been working with for over a year, delivered bad news. She could no longer work with me because of larger projects with tight deadlines from publishers. I was nearing the end of editing, expecting a review of my rewrites on the first 50-100 pages only. It felt like I was getting divorced right before retirement.

I don’t blame her–the work was better I am sure. But now the two weeks I had scheduled for her review, had become a week of interviewing new editors. Most asked to see the first 20–50 pages to provide estimates, and to gauge the quality. (They are all developmental editors looking for plot, characters development, POV, etc.). So I sent it and moped around waiting.

Then a funny thing happened.

The responses from the new editors–all of them entirely unfamiliar with my writing or story–came in. Glowing. One said she was hooked from the beginning of chapter one. Another replied, “I think your premise is ingenious, and your execution–from what I’ve seen so far–is remarkable. You are a dedicated, diligent, and detailed writer.”

I don’t say all this to brag (okay, maybe a teeny bit). I say this, because that setback  proved to be one of the best things for me.

Now I understand what my characters experience. Sometimes our stories take us to unexpected places. Perhaps it is through this adventure we find out who we truly are, and where we are going. Door closed, window opened.

Self-Publishing Tips

January 31st, 2014 • by Karen A. Chase • No Comments

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Last week I discussed the changes I’ve seen in self-publishing. I gave a talk on the subject, and then just this week I attended another self-publishing panel discussion. Many ideas and tips came out of all that preparation and chatting, and so I thought I’d share the whole big lot of them in one document.

You can get it here: HOW TO SELF-PUBLISH LIKE A PROFESSIONAL

Please note that the links I have in here are not endorsing the companies listed (except of course my own). These are just some businesses and references I’ve come across that have helped me figure out the industry and self-publishing steps.

My biggest tip? Be curious. Write. Write. Write–of course. And then learn the industry like your livelihood depends on it. It actually does.

Good luck.

Tips, thoughts and corrections are all welcome. What do you know?

 

 

Self-publishing Changes

January 24th, 2014 • by Karen A. Chase • 4 Comments

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Today I’m on my way to give a seminar on self-publishing at the Roanoke Regional Writers Conference. I gave a similar talk last June to a smaller group, but the publishing world is in constant change, so I’m scrambling to gather new information.

I do know that self-published authors are now also called Indie Publishers or Author-publishers. Only about 32% of Indie authors were rejected by traditional publishers, and now even authors like Jackie Collins have self-published e-books. Authors who self-publish and traditionally publish are called Hybrid Authors. Hybrids are the most successful, earning four times as much as the self-published.

There used to be six big publishers, now there are five. Self-published used to mean doing it all, but now there are middle-men companies, like Booktrope and AuthorHouse. With them, authors  retain copyrights but have help with professional editing, design and book packaging. Even PR groups like Smith Publicity, provide self-published book promotion options.

Once considered lame, self-published is now considered cool. We’re like Indie film-makers. While publishers mass-produce books their distributors want to sell, we create what readers want to buy and read. More of us are paying for professional editors and book covers now, too.

What hasn’t changed is very simple. Those authors (self or otherwise) who earn the most spend more of their time writing.  They spend almost 70% more time writing, write 1/3 more, and do the least amount of marketing. They write books for readers. They don’t sell to them.

How has self-publishing changed for you?